Sunday, July 24, 2005


It's a term I've heard and adopted into my vernacular. It's simple: pandering to Hispanics. Specifically relating to immigration...rather, illegal immigration.

Read this AP story, an excerpt of which follows:
A guest-worker program is favored by many Latinos and by businesses, many of them major GOP donors that depend on a steady flow of workers from Mexico and other countries. The White House effort is aimed at satisfying these groups while promoting tougher border security enforcement. The latter focus is an attempt to mollify a vocal bloc of cultural conservatives in the GOP — some in the House leadership — who argue that undocumented workers present a security threat and take some jobs that could be filled by Americans.
Count me as part of the latter group, namely the security issue. The "taking jobs" issue doesn't resonate with me. Jobs are earned. Employers hire who they see fit, though it makes perfect legal and logical sense that they should be foribidden from hiring people who are here illegally.

Rep. Tom Tancredo (R-CO) has been one of the most vocal (and common sense) voices about the security threat posed by loose immigration laws. He's often mischaracterized in the press (what? A Republican mischaracterized in the MSM? No way!) as wanting to lock down the borders. He simply wants legal immigration, which the vast majority of Americans support. Tancredo sees Bush's (and other Republicans') motives:
Tancredo accused the administration of forging an alliance with business executives who view migrants as a path to greater profits.

"They know this has nothing to do with Hispanic votes," he said. "They're trying to cover what their real motive is, which is to supply [business] with cheap labor, to not close the spigot of cheap labor…. But they've lost in Congress. They've lost the public. And now they're in damage control."

Tancredo asserted that Bush was in a bad spot politically, caught between public opinion favoring restrictive immigration policies and corporate interests that want looser policies. He said the apparent plans being laid by the new coalition seem to contrast with the message Bush gave to House leaders during a recent White House meeting: that the borders must be secured.

"I think he is trying to figure out a way to triangulate here," Tancredo said.
Tancredo's right about everything: business interests, public opinion, and the balancing act Bush (and others) are trying to do. For Bush's bravery in fighting Islamic terrorism, he sure can be a p#ssy when it comes to dealing with the immigration issue.

It's damned simple, black or white (no shades of gray): legal immigration is to be encouraged, illegal immigration is to be discouraged. Period. I know that the 9/11 hijackers came here legally, though I believe that many of them had expired student visas. I also know that illegal immigrants are hard workers who just want a better life for themselves and their families. That's why they should come here legally.

The point is that irrespective of 9/11, illegal immigration is a problem, and it is a potential (and preventable) security threat. There just is NO excuse for not respecting our laws. If you want open borders, then by God, abolish the INS and open them up...and best of luck with your re-election efforts if you suggest such a solution! However, as long as we have an INS and immigration laws, they should both be allowed to serve their purpose.